Monday, January 25, 2010

The Special Mother

Whenever I am feeling down, there is something I can read and it cheers me up almost instantaneously. This poem was written by Erma Bombeck and was read to us at the institute in Philadelphia. When they had finished reading, I don't believe there was a dry eye in the place!! I hope you like it......

The Special Mother

Most women become mothers by accident, some by choice, a few by social pressures, and a couple by habit.

This year, nearly 100,000 women will become mothers of handicapped children. Did you ever wonder how mothers of handicapped children are chosen?

Somehow, I visualize God hovering over Earth selecting His instruments for propagation with great care and deliberation. As He observes, he instructs His angels to make notes in a giant ledger.

“Armstrong, Beth: son. Patron saint, Matthew. Forest, Marjorie: daughter; patron saint, Cecilia.

“Rutledge, Carrie: twins. Patron saint….give her Gerard. He’s used to profanity.”

Finally, He passes a name to an angel and smiles. “Give her a handicapped child.”

The angel is curious. “Why this one, God? She’s so happy.”

“Exactly,” says God. “Could I give a child with a handicap to a mother who does not know laughter? That would be cruel.”

“But does she have patience?” asked the angel.

“I don’t want her to have too much patience, or she will drown in a sea of self-pity and despair. Once the shock and resentment wear off, she’ll handle it.”

“But Lord, I don’t think she even believes in you.”

God smiles. “No matter, I can fix that. This one is perfect. She has just enough selfishness.”

The angel gasps. “Selfishness? Is that a virtue?”

God nods. “If she can’t separate herself from the child occasionally, she’ll never survive. Yes, here is a woman whom I will bless with a child less than perfect. She doesn’t realize it yet, but she is to be envied.

“She will never take for granted a spoken word. She will never consider a step ordinary. When her child says ‘Momma’ for the first time, she will be witness to a miracle and know it? When she describes a tree or sunset to her blind child, she will see it as few people ever see my creations.

“I will permit her to see clearly the things I see--- ignorance, cruelty, prejudice---and allow her to rise above them. She will never be alone. I will be at her side every minute of every day of her life because she is doing my work as surely as she is here by my side.”

“And what about her patron saint?” asks the angel, his pen poised in mid-air.

God smiles. “A mirror will suffice.”

4 comments:

  1. That is beautiful, Jen. If I may, here is another beautiful piece by her.

    IF I HAD MY LIFE TO LIVE OVER -
    by Erma Bombeck
    (written after she found out she was dying from cancer).

    I would have gone to bed when I was sick instead of pretending the earth would go into a holding pattern if I weren't there for the day.

    I would have burned the pink candle sculpted like a rose before it melted in storage.

    I would have talked less and listened more.

    I would have invited friends over to dinner even if the carpet was stained, or the sofa faded.

    I would have eaten the popcorn in the 'good' living room and worried much less about the dirt when someone wanted to light a fire in the fireplace.

    I would have taken the time to listen to my grandfather ramble about his youth.

    I would have shared more of the responsibility carried by my husband.

    I would never have insisted the car windows be rolled up on a summer day because my hair had just been teased and sprayed.

    I would have sat on the lawn with my grass stains.

    I would have cried and laughed less while watching television and more while watching life.

    I would never have bought anything just because it was practical, wouldn't show soil, or was guaranteed to last a lifetime.

    Instead of wishing away nine months of pregnancy, I'd have cherished every moment and realized that the wonderment growing inside me was the only chance in life to assist God in a miracle.

    When my kids kissed me impetuously, I would never have said, "Later. Now go get washed up for dinner." There would have been more "I love you's" More "I'm sorry's."

    But mostly, given another shot at life, I would seize every minute...look at it and really see it ... live it and never give it back.STOP SWEATING THE SMALL STUFF!!!

    Don't worry about who doesn't like you, who has more, or who's doing what.

    Instead, let's cherish the relationships we have with those who do love us.

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  2. Um, I'm pretty speechless after reading that. Totally feel it. Totally love it. It makes me feel "special".

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  3. I've read that poem before...it is a beautiful one. I don't know why God does what He does sometimes and maybe it's not for me to understand...but you are a strong, amazing, beautiful mother who is handling the life around you with much grace.

    Much love and soft hugs to you and your little one...

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  4. Jen,

    I really needed a reminder why some of us are blessed with the special children that we have. I have been fighting with the school district agian and it makes everyday that much more hard. We are strong enough for the challenge of having a child with special needs, however that does not make everyday easy and sometimes days just SUCK!!! But that is ok too. Hang in there I know that it can be hard :o)

    Adrienne

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